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Indie Of The Month: Phyllis Tuckwell ‘The Antique’ Shop

Published on: 13 Dec, 2019
Updated on: 13 Dec, 2019

By Hugh Coakley

The charity shops in our towns do great work recycling our ‘pre-loved’ possessions. And sometimes, one of these shop stands out as exceptional.

I would say that about the Phyllis Tuckwell Furniture and Home branch in Guildford’s upper High Street.

It is different and Amanda Hill, the manager, said: “It is a destination shop. People say that we are known as the antique shop even though we sell a lot more than antiques.”

There is nothing quite like it in Guildford. If you can’t find a present here, you aren’t looking properly.

A selection of good quality furniture and home items at the Phyllis Tuckwell shop in the upper High Street.

Walking into the shop, you are struck by the sheer variety and interest. The walls are covered with paintings and prints, varying from a couple of pounds to £150 for well known artists.

Forget about the pictures, the frames alone are worth a look.

A selection of mirrors from the small to the magnificent.

And the shop, which is much deeper than I expected, is full of good quality furniture, from antiques to more modern items. Table lamps, mirrors, a dinner service, a dolls house, models, desks, cupboards and settees, coffee tables and bookcases. The list, which must change daily, could go on and on.

And if there was a list, it would definitely stop at the old looking commode in the corner which does stand out a bit.

Looking for the unusual? A commode in the Phyllis Tuckwell furniture shop might be just what you are seeking.

It is all such good quality. Where does it come from, I asked. “All donated,” said Amanda.

The furniture charity shop has been in the town for six years, three years in the current location and three years in Tunsgate before that and it is doing well, said Amanda.

The shop can make you a unique cake stand for £12.50. You pick the plates from the shop and they will do the rest.

They ‘up cycle’ furniture as well. They have a little area at the back of the shop which they use for painting furniture and upholstering.

“There are only two of us working here.” Amanda said, as she dashed around the shop, placing a new item on display. “I haven’t got a lot of time to talk,” she added.

The little work area at the back of the shop where they ‘up cycle’ preloved items.

People come here regularly looking for the unusual or the bargain or, as Amanda said: “Looking to furnish places from scratch.” As a cross between a traditional charity shop and an antiques market, it would get that three-bed semi off to a stylish beginning.

If you are struggling for a Christmas present, the Phyllis Tuckwell Furniture and Home branch in the upper High Street would be an excellent place to start.

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