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Van the Man Helps Get Cancer Charity Bus On the Road

Published on: 20 Jan, 2022
Updated on: 21 Jan, 2022

The Prostate Project used two glittering nights of music at G Live on January 5 and 6 featuring Van (the man) Morrison, Paul Carrack and Kiki Dee to launch its ambitious fundraising drive for a mobile prostate cancer detection bus.

Van Morrison, Paul Jones and the Jaw Bone band entertaining the crowd at G Live. Photo: Blackham Images.

Based on its successful Buy-a-Brick campaign, which saw more than £3 million raised by the volunteer and Surrey-based charity for the Stokes Centre for Urology at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, the latest initiative is encouraging people to ‘Get on Board’ and buy £10 tickets to help raise £200,000 to purchase, kit-out and run a mobile PSA blood testing clinic.

The ‘Bus’ as it is affectionately known, will help raise awareness of prostate cancer, acting as a mobile blood-testing unit capable of visiting difficult to reach communities and places where men congregate socially such as golf clubs and sporting events. It will even operate at weekends and out of hours.

More than 12,000 men a year die of prostate cancer in the UK, but with early diagnosis, outcomes are improved significantly, which is why all men over 50, particularly those with a family history of prostate cancer, or of Afro-Caribbean heritage are encouraged to consider having a simple PSA blood test.

The chairman of The Prostate Project, Alf Turner, said: “We wanted something that everybody could identify with, and the idea of supporting the bus by getting on board seemed like the obvious plan.

“People can buy a single ticket, or as many as they like, and they can be sure that every £10 will go directly to purchasing, equipping, and running the unit.

“We know that our loyal supporters will certainly ‘get on board’ and the reaction we had at the launch events showed that we are well and truly on the road to success.

“The PSA test is a simple blood test to detect prostate cancer, but we need to make it easier for men to access. Unbelievably, some people still think that the test is a little more, shall we say ‘intrusive’, but it’s not, and part of the reason for the clinic is to allow as many men as possible to have this simple blood test that saves lives.”

The Prostate Project is working in partnership with the Surrey and Sussex Cancer Alliance on the fundraising drive with the plan being to have the mobile unit on the road by autumn this year.

Professor Stephen Langley, professional director of cancer services at the Royal Surrey County Hospital, and a trustee of the charity, says the COVID-19 pandemic over the past 18 months has highlighted the increased need for introducing a mobile clinic.

He said: “Since the start of the pandemic there has been a significant reduction in referrals to secondary care hospitals for suspected prostate cancer in Surrey and Sussex, so it is vital that we reach these men, and the mobile clinic will provide a huge resource to do so.

“Early prostate cancer usually causes no symptoms and the only way to catch it early is to have a PSA blood test, so please get on board and help us to buy this clinical bus.”

Dr Alex Norman, Surrey and Sussex Cancer Alliance’s co-medical director, added: ““We are incredibly excited to be working with The Prostate Project to deliver this service.

“A mobile clinic will enable us to go to the heart of the communities across our cancer region and find those missing men who unfortunately did not come forward during the pandemic. It will take us one step closer towards our ambition to catch prostate cancer at an earlier stage and improve outcomes, especially for those within the risk factor groups.”

The musical spectacular, organised by Tony Smith of Eclectic Live Music, launched the campaign in great style with singer Paul Jones and Friends.

Click here to buy a ticket and donate.

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